homelandThe Penobscot people understood the complexities of their environment – how to navigate the Penobscot River in all seasons, for instance – and had a detailed knowledge of the land long before European settlers arrived.

In this unit, students will become historians and gather information about the Penobscot or Wabanaki people and study maps with place names in Penobscot and explore their meanings. Students will then use what they learn about the language to navigate their way through the Penobscot River.

This unit was created by the Penobscot people to deepen student awareness about the historical and complex Penobscot knowledge of the land we now call Maine and to refute the many resources that claim the Penobscot people lacked this understanding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Files

 

April 7, 1604

French cartographer Samuel de Champlain leaves from France with a French nobleman, Pierre Du Gua De Monts, for Maine. They entered the Bay of Fundy by May, and later Champlain would meet Penobscot Chief Bashabez at the mouth of the Kenduskeag Stream on the Penobscot River.